Message from Perseverance on Mars: It’s time …


In a statement from NASA, it was reported that the robotic arm of the Mars spacecraft Perseverance will begin to examine the base of the former crater, which was once a lake.

Recently, it was stated that the Perseverance spacecraft, which served as a communications base for the Ingenuity Mars helicopter and was busy documenting the helicopter’s flights, also focused on rocks located on the surface of the Jezero crater.

PERSEVERANCE: FROM FIELD PHOTOGRAPHY TO SCIENCE RESEARCH

In the post about the Perseverance spacecraft on social media, the following statements were made:

“The time has come: I’m moving from field photography to science researcher. Was there any life in this ancient lake bed? The devices I brought will help the hunt to begin. I am a robot on duty ”

IT WILL HELP TO CREATE A SCHEDULE ABOUT WHEN THE LAKE IS FORMED AND DRIED

It was stated that the information to be obtained will help scientists create a timeline of when the lake there was formed, when it dried out, and when sediment began to accumulate in the delta formed in the crater long ago.

It was also noted that understanding this timeline would likely have preserved a record of ancient microbes and would help date rock samples to be collected later in the mission.

DEVICES IN THE VEHICLE ALLOW MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE KRATER

It was stated that a camera named WATSON at the end of the robotic arm of the vehicle took detailed photos of the rocks, and a pair of zoomable cameras that make up the Mastcam-Z viewer in the ‘head’ of the vehicle also examined the terrain.

These devices, and others, have reportedly allowed scientists to learn more about the Jezero crater and navigate areas they might want to study in more depth.

“EVERY ROCK TYPE TELLS A DIFFERENT STORY”

In the statement made, “The important question that scientists want to answer: Whether these rocks are sedimentary (such as sandstone) or magmatic (composed of volcanic activity). Each type of rock tells a different story. Some sedimentary rocks are more suitable for preserving biological signatures or past life signs. “Magmatic rocks, on the other hand, are more precise geological clocks that allow scientists to create an accurate timeline of how a region was formed.”